5 Ways to Avoid Underselling Yourself in Your CV

You have a relaxing afternoon at the National Monument of Scotland, and you wouldn't miss the Scott Monument at dusk. Your ankles seemed to be hurting when you encountered a chap rambling about the free market. It didn't free us (or so he thought). The tram obstructed the view of the Scott Monument (and the Edinburgh Castle in the distance) when you pondered about what the fellow was telling everyone a while ago. You've been working 42 hours a week, and the possibility of being unpaid for those extra hours didn't cross your mind until now. You almost lost your balance. You planned to visit the Royal Mile the following day, but it didn't entice you during that moment. You wanted to go to the Princess Street Gardens and assess your career options. Someone might read your mind and wish you to break a leg.

You were about to leave for London King's Cross railway station when you overheard your colleagues talking about Lord Skidelsky. The eminent economist would overhead an inquiry about cutting the working week to four days. You became interested in economics after reading "The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine" by Michael Lewis, and this (non-fiction) book prompted you to do a quick search on John Maynard Keynes. Why didn't he think about it decades ago? Britons have been struggling with the lack of affordable housing, job insecurity, and personal debt, but all of these were nothing compared to the lack of free time. You should know after working for the same company for a number of years; there were times when you felt trapped in the Underground. And your best mate was a bit concerned about your online purchase of tickets on the Virgin Trains website on a number of occasions. You might be yearning for a shorter working week, but you've been denying about it all this time. It might be a reality in the very immediate future, which would excite you a bit. Nothing is written in stone, so you don't want to hold your breath. Then again, nothing can't stop you from thinking about the possibilities.

What a Shorter Working Week Can Do to You

You will achieve a sense of balance. You become tired of your father bemoaning about the wealth inequality in Great Britain, but you've been thinking about it while gazing at the manicured lawns (in the northern parts of England). You've been too busy pursuing an undergraduate degree when you learn about the wealthy individuals controlling the media. It didn't bother you at all. You might be apathetic about it (due to social media), but a shorter working week might bring an end to it. You can look for a part-time job, if not leave your current job and look for remote work. It can save you lots of money, also give you more time in household chores. (It's been months since you tell yourself that you to clean up your flat.) Lord Skidelsky may not like a 15-hours-a-week proposal, but 30 hours seem reasonable enough. It should depend on the individual, and it can be longer in your case. (You miss the cultural events, which have kept you occupied during your university days.) The next item might dispel your doubts.

You will become happier in your job role. It may be the long hours that sap off the enthusiasm you've shown during your first few months in the office. You've been insisting that you didn't become jaded about the office culture, as you became unaware of the emptiness. (It's fine if you don't admit it.) The shorter working week should give you renewed vigour, as the free time means more options. You've been wanting not to set your alarm clock, and you wonder if you can do it on a Thursday evening. You must hold that thought.

Your sickness level would go from five to zero. You won't tell your boss that you would feign sickness on a couple of occasions, and you don't want to do it one more time. A shorter working week should make you resolve on that one. It can help you plan your holiday, your first on your current job. (You haven't been to the continent for ages. And you can't wait to make your workmates green with envy. You really want to return the favor.) Amsterdam has sentimental value, as your family has been to the Dutch capital a number of times. This is a good reason to talk to your parents.

The Best Decision Ever?

You’re well aware that not all change is good while moving forward doesn’t yield the desired outcome in some cases. It doesn’t mean that Lord Skidelsky is about to commit a huge mistake. (And Ross Ashcroft’s “Four Horsemen” must be part of the undergraduate curriculum.) You would know when you cross the bridge, yet you wouldn’t disagree with the fact that a long sleep should make you more cheerful about the gray weather (and longer nights). A shorter working week can be good for everyone.

We picked up related articles
To Eat or Not to Eat: Is Cake Culture Good for the Office?
To Eat or Not to Eat: Is Cake Culture Good for the Office?
Does your boss cake-shame you? Weigh your response before you react indignantly.
How to Effectively Use Your 3 Hours Commute a Day
How to Effectively Use Your 3 Hours Commute a Day
Three hours a day won't be long enough to write a novel, even learn a foreign language. It can happen if it's done on a certain period of time, and with determination and must-do mindset.
How to Answer 'Brainteaser' Questions During Interview
How to Answer 'Brainteaser' Questions During Interview
You must expect ridiculous questions during a job interview. There's no need to panic about it, as this article helps you prepare for it.