Are You Happy About the Jobs Boom in Northern England?

You're doing fine in London, where your (rented) flat is not far from Regent's Park. It's a nice neighborhood, even if you wish there are more maple trees in your area. (This is the reason why you like to pass by Paddington whenever you have the chance.) However, the signs of inequality can be seen in some parts. You're worried about Brexit (like everyone else). And you heard about the jobs boom in Northern England. Your father is a native of York, so you can't help but smile about it. Are you happy about it? If you don't get the question, then let's rephrase it. Does the news make you unhappy about your current place (in London)? Your mother was a huge fan of Dame Edith Evans, praising her performance in "The Whisperers". Your flatmate once told you about Robert Nicolson's novel, which the movie was based on, and how you became interested in it. (You couldn't find the time to read the book, not even watch a film during your younger years.) You do know Oldham, where the story is set in. Your father had relatives not far from the town, and how the inhabitants saw better days. And then the decline. (The story of "The Whisperers" happened during that bleak period.) Everyone in the flat, including your department, remembered "The Full Monty". Sheffield may be located in the Midlands, but it wasn't far from the northern areas. The city also undergone difficult times. In the case of Oldham, it was the textile industry that led to the town's rise and fall. In the case of Sheffield, it was the steel industry. You believed that there was a thing called business cycle, but you couldn't figure out if it the term applies to the rise and fall of communities. You couldn't help but wonder if the jobs boom in Northern England could be linked to London (and Southern England). You don't have a clue. and the cold couldn’t forced you to think harder. But you know that Britons deserve better. Relocating to Northern England would be out of the question, and it had nothing to do with a remark by your ex-colleague. (His parents are natives of Chennai. He can't but wonder why the tourist attractions in the southern parts are more attractive. You can't give a straight answer. The sights might be too familiar.) You're not thinking of a career change, not even looking for opportunities in the continent. (And crossing the Atlantic didn't cross your mind.) The jobs boom deserves your time. And you may need a good cup of tea.

Reflecting on the Present (and Future)

Have you seen the signs of economic boom? No. You don't have any inclination in venturing into local manufacturing and mining, two sectors that Northern England would rely on. You have an inkling that the northern parts have a similar case with Germany, but the approach would be different. You won't think much about it, as you have your little worries to keep you occupied most of the time. Then again, there are a number of times that you wish that you can get out of London. You may find a better fortune elsewhere, yet you're not thinking about the north. (History didn't interest you that much, even if York has lots to offer to history buffs and tourists alike.) You may have a problem if you start thinking of huge plans. It won't be a year-long adventure away from home. Yet. Is the gig economy changing? Hermes is starting to acknowledge workers' rights, but you think that there's nothing new to it at all. It's all about certain practices (or exploitation), and you know that there's always a way. Option (or the lack of it) may be the problem. It's not so different in the north, but it's your opinion. The word's still out in zero-hour contract. You're fortunate that you're working in a different field, where you don't see such an issue. Then again, nothing is cheap in the capital. It can change your mood in an instant. Does your location have something to do with it? You know that different people from different backgrounds have different views. It also applies to cities and towns, where it seems impossible to achieve equality across the landscape. (You know your Dickens too well to deduce it.) You can work like it’s your first month, even try to live a frugal existence. (Your best mate is teasing you about the perks of working in another country. You’re not surprised at all, as Toronto seems to be in a better place. You’re not too sure about the lower temperature, though.) The news may not make you think about relocation, but you have goals. Can you meet it before you turn 40? You need a steely reserve if you want a definite response.

Hey England: The Good News

You have suspected that the money would be more concentrated on London and Southern England, but you haven’t wondered if it would accept tourism. It could lead to more problems, but you have other things to tend to. You rather think of your own work-life balance, but the jobs boom may be too good to be true. The news is good enough to warm you during these cold days, though.

We picked up related articles
How to Answer 'Brainteaser' Questions During Interview
How to Answer 'Brainteaser' Questions During Interview
You must expect ridiculous questions during a job interview. There's no need to panic about it, as this article helps you prepare for it.
5 Ways to Avoid Underselling Yourself in Your CV
5 Ways to Avoid Underselling Yourself in Your CV
You must know that your CV is a marketing tool, which shows that you’re the best professional out there. You're rather interested in your field of specialty, wanting to connect with the brightest people (in that industry). You can achieve it if you follow a few rules.
How to Effectively Use Your 3 Hours Commute a Day
How to Effectively Use Your 3 Hours Commute a Day
Three hours a day won't be long enough to write a novel, even learn a foreign language. It can happen if it's done on a certain period of time, and with determination and must-do mindset. This applies to commuting, which may surprise you at first.